Golf

The Audubon certified, 27 hole championship private golf course was designed by the talented team of course architect Chip Powell and Senior PGA Tour Player, Mike Hill. The three nine-hole courses, the Sound, the River, and the Lakes, were thoughtfully created to preserve the integrity of the many areas of wetlands and woodlands. The result is an ecologically sound environment with phenomenal play that even the Professionals find challenging. Each course has a set of seven tees ranging from 4600 yards to 7100 yards that offer every level of player an equal opportunity to enjoy their long and short game, and improve their skills. Eighteen-hole rounds are made of two nine-hole courses, which rotate on a daily basis. This ensures top quality maintenance on the course and an ever changing challenge for the player; making Pelican Sound the naturally perfect place to play.

Improving your game or learning the game is easy at Pelican Sound with large practice facilities featuring putting and chipping areas as well as an aqua driving range. Our excellent golf professional team, lead by Master Golf Professional Steve Cox and assisted by Golf Professional Kurt Stegle, excel in teaching. They offer golf schools, mini-schools, golf clinics, and private lessons throughout the year. You'll find new partners and friends on Friday Men's Day, Tuesday Ladies' Day, Sunday Couples' events or Thursday Twilight Golf.

Pelican Sound Golf & River Club is one of 75 courses in Florida and 599 courses in the world to receive the honor. Golf courses from the United States, Australia, Canada, South America, and Southeast Asia have also achieved certification in the program. The golf course joined the ACSP in 2001 and was designated as a Certified Audubon Cooperative Sanctuary in 2003. After designation, courses go through a recertification process every two years. During the last recertification process, Mr. Todd Lowe, Agronomist with the United States Golf Association and member of the Audubon Stewards Network, was given a tour of the course and sent his observations to Audubon International.